MD1888 eyewear patent-pending hinge MD1888 eyewear patent-pending hinge

Brand
History

Owen Morgan-Davies, a famous entrepreneur in Wales at the time, moved to Liverpool with his young family in 1888. His personal frames survived and were handed down to his great-great-grandson Tom Davies, who used the frame as inspiration for the MD1888 collection.

Brand
History

Owen Morgan-Davies, a famous entrepreneur in Wales at the time, moved to Liverpool with his young family in 1888. His personal frames survived and were handed down to his great-great-grandson Tom Davies, who used the frame as inspiration for the MD1888 collection.

MD1888 eyewear hinges

Our unique
hinge

When Tom Davies was given his great-great-grandfather’s glasses, he marvelled at the craftsmanship of the hinge on the frame. For something so old, it was extraordinarily delicate and refined. Tom went about trying to modernise the design and innovate the idea for a modern collection.

The result was a hinge which changed the way glasses are made. Until now, hinges have been connected to the front by pins or by heat-sinking a claw into the front.

MD1888 eyewear hinges


Our unique
hinge

When Tom Davies was given his great-great-grandfather’s glasses, he marvelled at the craftsmanship of the hinge on the frame. For something so old, it was extraordinarily delicate and refined. Tom went about trying to modernise the design and innovate the idea for a modern collection.

The result was a hinge which changed the way glasses are made. Until now, hinges have been connected to the front by pins or by heat-sinking a claw into the front.


MD1888 eyewear inspiration
MD1888 frames being filed by hand at the brand's London factory

The pins are great but can be delicate and easy to break on thinner frames. Could we make something new and improve both the stability and the cosmetic appearance for this type of construction?

Firstly, we mill out some material and then plant a stainless steel bolt inside the acetate, sealing it back up with more acetate. We then drill into the frame and secure the temple arm directly into the bolt. This prevents the arm coming away from the frame when too much pressure is applied and also… looks fantastic.

Our new technique is patent pending.





The pins are great but can be delicate and easy to break on thinner frames. Could we make something new and improve both the stability and the cosmetic appearance for this type of construction?

Firstly, we mill out some material and then plant a stainless steel bolt inside the acetate, sealing it back up with more acetate. We then drill into the frame and secure the temple arm directly into the bolt. This prevents the arm coming away from the frame when too much pressure is applied and also… looks fantastic.

Our new technique is patent pending.